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New DOE Commercial Furnace and Air Conditioning Efficiency Standards

Daniel Sheflin


Daniel Sheflin has an extensive background in resource management, most recently serving as an executive with the Automation Control Solutions Division of Honeywell International. Daniel Sheflin has also led the Smart Grid Federal Advisory Committee of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and he has a longstanding interest in energy efficiency.

The Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced ambitious new efficiency standards for commercial furnaces and air conditioners that are expected to reduce CO2 emissions by nearly 900 metric tons over the equipment’s lifetime and provide cost savings approaching $170 billion. These rooftop units are ubiquitous on commercial buildings, with big-box retail stores typically requiring 20 or more to control the climate inside.

The new DOE rules mandate 10 percent greater efficiency by 2018 and 25 percent by 2023. An encouraging aspect of the new standards is that they were industry initiated. A diverse group of stakeholders, including utilities, contractors, manufacturers, and environmental organizations, came together to ask the DOE to play a lead role in engineering the new rules.

Daniel Sheflin has an extensive background in resource management, most recently serving as an executive with the Automation Control Solutions Division of Honeywell International. Daniel Sheflin has also led the Smart Grid Federal Advisory Committee of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and he has a longstanding interest in energy efficiency.

The Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced ambitious new efficiency standards for commercial furnaces and air conditioners that are expected to reduce CO2 emissions by nearly 900 metric tons over the equipment’s lifetime and provide cost savings approaching $170 billion. These rooftop units are ubiquitous on commercial buildings, with big-box retail stores typically requiring 20 or more to control the climate inside.
The new DOE rules mandate 10 percent greater efficiency by 2018 and 25 percent by 2023. An encouraging aspect of the new standards is that they were industry initiated. A diverse group of stakeholders, including utilities, contractors, manufacturers, and environmental organizations, came together to ask the DOE to play a lead role in engineering the new rules.

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